Rotary hydraulic coupling

Abstract

Claims

y 8, 1952 P. T. LEAHY 2,602,296 ROTARY HYDRAULIC COUPLING Filed April 9. 1947 2 SHEETS- Sl-IEET INVENTOR. PATRICK 7f LEAH) By iL/JM ATTORNEYS Patented July 8, 1952 Patrick 'rifigeahy, Cleveland, ohm, assignor to 'Y George F. Metzger and Gilbert T. Leahy, Cleveland, Ohio": Application This invention relates to improvements in hydraulic transmissions of the type adapted. to facilitate clutching and braking actions. I The primary objectof. the invention is to construct an apparatus which may serve as a transmission to pick up loads slowly irrespective of the speed of the driving element and act to put in motion the driven element within a relatively short space of time. Another object of the .inventionis to provide a series of passageways within the transmission housing which are arranged to effect the circulation of the'fluid from oneend of the case to the other and thus minimize foaming of the fluid. Further objects of the invention residein the provision of a structure which is silent. of. operation, economic of manufacture, simpleof construction and efficient of operation. Other objects and advantages more or less ancillary to the foregoing and the manner in which all the various objects are realized will appear inthe following description, which, considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, sets forth the preferred embodiment of the invention. Referring to the drawings: 7 Fig. 1 is a vertical longitudinal section through the improved hydraulic transmission; Fig.2 is a transverse section of the transmission illustrated in Fig. l, the section being taken on a plane indicated by line 2-2 in Fig. 1;. v Fig. 3 is a transverse section'through'the transmission, the section being taken on a plane indicated by line 3-3 in Fig. 1; and I Fig. 4 is a view in perspective of the rotor and power input drive shaft. a I Referring first to Fig. 1, the transmission comprises a pair of cylindricalhousing elements It] and II formed with companion flanges l2 drilled for the reception of bolts or cap screws l3. The housing member ID is formedwith a boss I4 in the center thereof which'isb'ored to receive the power input shaft I5, of the rotor. l6 and counterbored to receive an anti-friction bearing 11 and packing l8. The free end of the boss I4 is provided with a packing gland l9 which is formed with a flange 20 engageable with the packing [8 when drawn into an intimate engagement therewith through the threads 2|. The inner face of the end walls of the housing members l and I l are counterbored to receive spiders 22 formed as illustrated in Fig. 3 with radially disposed vanes 23 constituting baffles or scuppers bent to resist the flow of fluid circulated thereover in order toincrease the pressure exerted by the fluid upon the housing members. The hub portions 24 April 9, 1941, Serial No. 0,332 i [4 Claims. (01. -54) of spiders 22 are welded or'otherwise affixed to a boss 25 defining the inner wall of the counterbored seat for the spiders. The housing member H is formed with a boss terminating in a shaft26 in the center of the outer wall thereof-disposed in axial alignment with the driveshaft l5. The end portion ofthe boss 26 is of a reduced diameter and constitutes the power output or driven shaft ofthetransmissionmechanism?r The housing .members In and l l. are machined with bores ofequal. diameter in orderto supporta ,flutedgbaille 28 which is anchored .therein against rotative movement by lugs 29 welded-to the inner wall of the housing members between theflutes of the baffle 28. The lugs are preferably of rectangular cross section in order to accommodate longitudinal separation of the housing members; The baffle mayibe formed asindicated from a sheet metalflplate or cast to provide similar longi tudinalgrooves in the. wall thereof or machined from a solid ring. The rotor comprises a hub v30 bored for the reception of the drive shaft .15 and formed with flanged endportions 3| and 32 (Fig. 4), kerfed to receive blades 33 which are seated therein in fixed relation thereto. The blades are disposed in angularir'elation to the axis of. the shaft I5and the-freeends of the longitudinal edges thereof are machined concentric with the crest of the lands of the fluted baffle 28. The flutes of the baffle 28 define longitudinal'passageways 28a, between the inner walls of the crests thereof and the cylindrical walls of the housing. The outer ends 28b of the crests of the flutes are chamfered to afford fluid communication between the chambered end walls of. thehousing members and the passageways 28a. Thus when the transmission is in operation, the angularly disposed blades 33 will forcethe fluid in housing into one. end of the passageway 28 a and out through the other end thereof thereby causing a continuous vortical flowof the fluid. The fluid flow, after leaving the turbine blades 28, is urged in the direction of the angulation of the impeller blades 33 by the general directional flow of the fluid leaving said impeller blades. The vanes 23 located in the spider 22 at the end of the housing are set to resist the directional flow of the fluid leaving the path of the impeller blades 33 and the turbine blades 28. The blades 23 are shaped to direct. the flow of the fluid outward toward the passage opening 28b. The vanes 23 of the spider 22 located in the end housing opposite the said directional flow caused by said impeller blades are set to receive in the housings, is then filled to approximately, ninety per cent (90%) of its capacity with oil of the character generally employed-in transmissions of this type. The oil or other transmission fluid may be injected into the chamber through an opening 35 which is sealed by a pipe plug 35. In operation, the power applied through the drive shaft l5 effects the rotation of the rotor l6- which impels the oil within the housing against The angularityof the blades 33,-tendsto circu- 5 late a'portion of the fluid fiK filly against the adjacent.v runner blades 22, the impact forceof the oil adding to therotational energy imparted to the cylinder. The oil which has been dischargedaxially from the rotor is returned to the inlet end of the rotor through a. set. of passages 28a in the fluted bafile to the opposite end of the cylinder. By providing the glosed channel, unrestricted and undisturbed axial return flow is achieved whichimproves the operation of the device. since a vortical flow path is established. Although theforegoing description is necessarily of a detailed character, in order that the in-v vention may be completely set forth, it is to be understood that the specific terminology is not intended to be restrictive or confining, and that various rearrangements of parts and modifications of detail'may be resorted to without departing from the scope or spirit of theinvention as herein claimed. What I claim is: a 1. A fluid coupling comprising a closed cylinder constituting, a runner, a rotor therein constituting an impeller, a drive shaft for'the rot-or,'blades on said rotor disposed in. angular relation to the axis of the rotor, a fluted cylindrical baflie on the, inner circumferential wall of the cylinder defining passageways for axial flow of the fluidin said cylin-v der, a set of said passageways being open to radial flow from the rotor, and a second set of passageways open at each end to provide for axialfiow of fluid discharged from the trailing ends of the rotor blades at one end of the cylinder to reenter the leading ends of the rotor blades at the oppoe site end of the cylinder. 2. A fluid coupling comprising a closed cylinder constituting a runner, a rotor therein constituting an impeller, a drive shaft for the rotor, blades on said rotor disposed in angular relation to the axis of the rotor, radial bafiies in the end walls of the cylinder, a fluted cylindrical baflie on the inner circumferential wall of the cylinder definingpassageways, for axial flowerthe fluid in said cylinderja'set of. said passageways being open to radial flow from the rotor, and a second set of passageways open to flow from the radial bafiles at one end of the cylinder for returning the oil discharged from said radial bafiles to the radial bafiles'at the opposite end of the cylinder. 3. A fluid coupling comprising a closed cylinder constituting a runner, a rotor therein constituting an impeller, a drive shaft for the rotor, blades on said rotor disposed in angular relation to the axis of the rotor, radial baliies in the end walls of the cylinder, a fluted cylindrical baflie on the inner circumferential wall of the cylinder defining passageways for axial flow of the fiu'id'in said cylinder, a set "of said passageways each, having aside open to radial flow from the rotor, and a second se of p ssag w s ha in th en he e n to'flow from the radial baffles atone'end'of the cylinder for returning] the oil discharged from said radial baflles to the radial baffies at the opposite end of the cylinder. I 4. A fluid coupling comprising a closed cylinder constituting a runner, a rotor'thereinconstitub ing an impeller, a drive shaft for the rotor,' blades on said rotor disposed injang'ular relation to the axis of the rotor, radial baflles 'in"the end walls of the cylinder, a fluted cylindrical baffle on the inner circumferential wall of the cylinder defining passageways for axial flow of the fluid in said cylinder, a set of said passageways each having aside open to radial flow from the rotor, and a second set of passageways having the ends thereof open to flowfrom the radial bailles at one end of the cylinder for returning the. oil dis-v charged from said radial baffles to the radial bafiles at the opposite end of the cylinder, said end wall bafiies terminating in proximity with said passageways. I . PATRICKv T. LEAHY; R FERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,636,050 Fottinger July 19, 1927 1,862,045 Beaumont et al June 7, 1932 2,287,498 Scofield 11 June 23, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 6,233 Great Britain Mar. 10, 1897 16,785 GreatBritain July 18, '1912 271,380 Great Britain May 26, 1927 310,377 j GreatBritain iJu1y 10, 1930

Description

Topics

Download Full PDF Version (Non-Commercial Use)

Patent Citations (7)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    GB-189706233-AMarch 05, 1898Hugo Lentz, Julius Weigl, Arthur HerschmannImprovements in Means for Coupling Shafts and Shafting.
    GB-191216785-AJanuary 02, 1913Giovanni ZambonImprovements in Liquid Power-transmitting Apparatus
    GB-271380-AMay 26, 1927William Treavours EatonAn improved clutch, coupling, shock absorber, or the like
    GB-310377-AJuly 10, 1930Hans GradeImprovements in or relating to liquid gears
    US-1636050-AJuly 19, 1927Fottinger HermannDevice for damping the oscillations of multiple crank shafts
    US-1862045-AJune 07, 1932Beaumont Thomas Edgar, Waring John NoelApparatus for the hydraulic transmission of power
    US-2287498-AJune 23, 1942William W ScofieldHydraulic wheel drive

NO-Patent Citations (0)

    Title

Cited By (2)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    ES-2431550-R1December 17, 2013Vladut Valeriu LucianAcoplamiento viscoso coaxial
    US-2699643-AJanuary 18, 1955Douglas K WarnerHydraulic coupling for internal-combustion engines with exhaust gas turbines